Welcome! The Bloomington Life Sciences Partnership is a collaborative effort dedicated to continued life sciences business growth in greater Bloomington, Indiana - a nationally recognized leading metro area in medical devices, contract pharma, biotechnology, basic research and life sciences workforce development.
Indiana Biosciences Research Institute Names CEO
May22

Indiana Biosciences Research Institute Names CEO

David Broecker Named CEO of Indiana Biosciences Research Institute   Nationally Recognized Real Estate Developer – Wexford Science and Technology – Chosen to Lead Development Activities David Broecker The Indiana Biosciences Research Institute (IBRI) announces the appointment of David A. Broecker, a prominent life sciences industry executive and serial entrepreneur, as the Institute’s president and chief executive officer, and the selection of Wexford Science and Technology as the real estate development firm to lead site selection and development activities.   After serving most recently as president and chief operating officer, Broecker will now accelerate activities as president and CEO to advance the Institute’s mission, select a permanent home, secure key research recruitments, build a seasoned operations team and launch the IBRI’s first collaborative research initiatives in 2015.   “As our Board moves forward with creating the IBRI, it is increasingly clear that we need a CEO who truly covers all the bases, with the experience and the passion to build a world-class research institute in collaboration with our diverse and deeply committed array of industry and academic stakeholders,” said David L. Johnson, IBRI board member and president and CEO of BioCrossroads, which has facilitated the Institute’s early development. “We are fortunate indeed that David Broecker has returned home to Indiana and has enthusiastically accepted our appointment. There is no one in the country today better suited to deliver on the pioneering mission and immense promise of the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute,” Johnson added.   Click here for the full press release. Please follow and like...

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IU, IU Health Bloomington Hospital Announce New Health Complex
Apr15

IU, IU Health Bloomington Hospital Announce New Health Complex

Agreement outlines regional academic health campus and new IU Health Bloomington hospital location     Bloomington, Ind. – Indiana University, IU Health and IU Health Bloomington Hospital today announced they have reached an agreement to create a regional academic health center in Bloomington, which will include a new home for IU Health Bloomington Hospital.   The centerpiece of the project, announced this morning on the IU Bloomington campus, is the decision to locate IU Health Bloomington Hospital on the current site of the IU golf driving range on 75 acres just off the SR 45/46 bypass adjacent to the IU Technology Park.   “This is an incredibly exciting time in our hospital’s history. This collaboration will provide many benefits for our community, our hospital and IU,” says Mark Moore, President of IU Health Bloomington Hospital and the South Central Region. “We’ve been working with the community in Bloomington to determine how best to serve and deliver value to our fellow citizens, and this plan provides an extraordinary solution for meeting the emerging healthcare needs of the region,” he said. “This synergism will create tremendous opportunity for all parties concerned and especially our patients.”   Dan Evans, president and CEO of IU Health, said the project will strengthen the impact of IU Health’s tripartite mission in southern  Indiana.   “The creation of a regional academic health campus in Bloomington increases our ability to improve patient care by providing more opportunities for collaboration among our clinical, research and medical staff and faculty. It strengthens our partnership with the IU School of Medicine and our ability to develop a robust research program to bring more clinical trials and innovative treatment methods to the people of southern Indiana and beyond,” he said.   Though still in the early planning stages, the proposed health complex is expected to employ thousands, not only in construction positions but also in patient care and support services. It also will allow IU to expand its medical education programs and research opportunities on the Bloomington campus to keep up with increasing demand for practical experience from students in health-related disciplines, especially social work, nursing, hearing and speech therapy and dentistry.   “This is a momentous moment for Indiana University and IU Health – and for the city of Bloomington,” said Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie. “This plan will lead to the creation of the most comprehensive academic health campus in the state outside of Indianapolis and will bring together most of the IU Bloomington health science programs, and possibly additional programs, into one place co-located with the new IU Bloomington Hospital. This will considerably expand the opportunities for health...

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First Annual IUB Innovation Conference to be held April 24
Mar20

First Annual IUB Innovation Conference to be held April 24

The new Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology will be hosting its First Annual Innovation Conference at the Indiana Memorial Union, Frangipani Room on April 24 from 12:30 – 6:30pm. The event will feature a variety of speakers and topics, including an overview of the SBIR/STTR programs, the Spin-up Program at IURTC, angel investing, and more.  To register for the event, visit http://jceb.indiana.edu/opportunities.shtml. The mission of the Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology (JCEB) is to enhance translational research and industry partnerships at IU Bloomington.   Speakers & Topics include:   “State of Indiana SBIR/STTR Programs” “Overview of the SBIR/STTR Program, IUPUI “ Kristen Parmelee President, Parmelee Consulting Group, Inc.   “State of Indiana SBIR/STTR Programs” Lisa Hoverman, Ph.D. SBIR/STTR Program Specialist, Indiana PTAC, Office of Small Business & Entrepreneurship   “Spin-up Program at IURTC” Joe Trebley, Ph.D. Head of Startup Support and Promotion, Indiana University Research & Technology Corporation   “Working with IU Spin-up to Start a Small Business” Yvonne Lai, Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Hohmann Laboratory, and Navigator, Indiana Clinical Translational Sciences Institute   “The Indiana Ecosystem for Lifescience Entrepreneurism “ Jay McGill, Ph.D. Senior Director, LRL Operations – Science and Technology Partnerships, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company   “Angel Investing” Guest speaker TBA   “Antibody-based Prevention and Therapy for Infectious Diseases” Kevin Whaley, Ph.D. CEO, Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Inc. Please follow and like...

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Increases in jobs, wages and exports reinforce Indiana’s strength in life sciences
Feb04

Increases in jobs, wages and exports reinforce Indiana’s strength in life sciences

Industry boasts $59 billion impact to state’s economy   Indianapolis, February 4, 2015 –   Indiana continues to retain its strong leadership position in critical areas of its life sciences industry.  According to 2013 data, life sciences exports accounted for $9.8 billion (nearly one-third of Indiana’s total exports), the second highest number in the U.S. (behind only California), exporting $175,000 of products per worker.  The state had a workforce of more than 56,000, an increase of over 1,000 from the previous year, with an average salary of more than $90,000. This combination of jobs, exports and local research, development and manufacturing activities contributes a $59 billion total impact for the state’s economy.   “BioCrossroads and its unique collaborations have achieved many milestones: raising successive and return-driven venture capital and seed funds to build new companies, driving cooperation among industry, university, government and philanthropic entities, and developing a one-of-a-kind biosciences research institute to accelerate research and commercialization,” said David L. Johnson, president and CEO, BioCrossroads, Indiana’s initiative for investment, development and advancement of signature life sciences strengths.  “The result is a vibrant life sciences community that, among many impressive accomplishments, has doubled its economic impact – $32 billion to $59 billion- in just eleven years.”   More than 1,700 companies in the areas of drugs and pharmaceuticals, medical devices and equipment, agricultural chemicals and feedstock, medical, research and testing laboratories and biologistics are located throughout state. This number of establishments dropped slightly from 2012 to 2013, especially in the area of biologistics companies.   New discoveries and products are being developed at our pharmaceutical, medical device and agricultural companies and universities.    Indiana companies filed 682 patent for life sciences-related innovations, and 99 new products were approvedby the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Indiana universities submitted 983 patent filings during the same period.   This data, generated by the Indiana Business Research Center at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business and BioCrossroads, is from 2013, the most recent available.   Indiana is home to the global headquarters for: Anthem, Inc., Biomet, Cook Medical, DePuy Orthopaedics, Dow AgroSciences, Eli Lilly and Company, and Zimmer and the North American headquarters of Roche Diagnostics; Beckman Coulter, Boston Scientific, Covance, Express Scripts, Mead Johnson, and Medtronic all have major operations located within the state.   About BioCrossroads BioCrossroads (www.biocrossroads.com) advances Indiana’s signature strengths in the life sciences by connecting with corporate, academic and philanthropic partners; facilitating investments in promising start ups and building new enterprises; and educating through conferences, reports and market development knowledge.   The initiative supports the region’s existing research and corporate strengths while encouraging new business development and has formed several new nonprofit organizations,...

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IU’s Beaker Bubbleth Over with Global Chem Events
Dec01

IU’s Beaker Bubbleth Over with Global Chem Events

Hopeful new medicines, potential options to battle obesity and cutting-edge methods of studying the chemistry inside all of us—these were among the topics that drew a crowd from around the world to the small city of Bloomington. Smaller still is Indiana University’s Department of Chemistry, but IU chemists say its prestige is evident, judging by the crowd and the ability to bring international experts from around the globe—or even from down the hall—to participate in two recent events.   The Fifth Annual Watanabe Symposium in Chemical Biology drew a crowd of about 150 to focus on advancements in chemical biology that could lead to new medicines. Close on its heels was the 2014 Gill Symposium and Awards, a conference that covers a different topic within neuroscience each year.   “Indiana University is a world-renowned institute for chemical sciences,” says IU’s Linda & Jack Gill Chair of Biomolecular Sciences Dr. Richard DiMarchi. “It advertises to the external world who we are and distinguishes Indiana as a center that’s interested, active and leading in the biomedical sciences.” Listen   This year’s Watanabe Symposium in Chemical Biology was characterized by discussion about new technologies that allow chemists to dig deeper into human biology. DiMarchi describes chemical biology as the interface among chemistry, biology and human health.   “[The symposium] addressed the emergence of enabling technologies—chemical synthesis and chemical analysis of physical structure,” says DiMarchi. “At the core of biology is the need for tools to study biology. Chemistry is a requisite skillset. What we heard at this meeting was cutting-edge science in terms of preparing and studying those reagents that allow us to understand biology at a much higher level.” Listen   Both annual events fall under the leadership of DiMarchi, a chemist with an international reputation himself. He’s co-founded two startups, one of which was sold to Roche for more than $500 million. He helped commercialize six pharmaceuticals and was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame to honor his discovery and development of the designer insulin Humalog. Most recently, he was one of four scientists in the world to win the 2014 Erwin-Schrödinger-Prize for his role in developing a new treatment for type 2 diabetes.   Going hand-in-hand with type 2 diabetes is obesity, which was the topic for this year’s Gill Symposium. DiMarchi says the event hosted several world-renowned biologists in the field of obesity research and examined sophisticated new methods that may be able to control the disease.   “Obesity is a huge global problem. It’s an epidemic of disease with as many as a quarter of all adults globally overweight, and as much as 10 percent...

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Bloomington Companies win New Venture Competition
Oct31

Bloomington Companies win New Venture Competition

Bloomington Companies win New Venture Competition A company striving to find a better treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a startup creating video games to help rehabilitate stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients claimed the top prizes at the recent BioCrossroads New Venture Competition. Aiming to discover the most promising life sciences startups in the state, the competition also awards cash prizes and access to business resources to help smooth the often bumpy road to commercialization.   Leaders of Indianapolis-based Anagin believe the great need for a new method of treating PTSD was one factor that led their startup to win the competition. Co-founder and Indiana University School of Medicine Professor of Psychiatry Dr. Anantha Shekhar says the need to better treat this vulnerable population grows each day.   “There are several areas where there are wars and people coming back from combat duty—that’s the most obvious [need],” says Shekhar. “But there’s been an ongoing epidemic of unrecognized trauma in all kinds of daily living situations—urban trauma and trauma policemen or firefighters face every day.”   Shekhar says current treatments are only effective in about one of every three patients, and the drugs target only the symptoms of PTSD. Anti-depressants and anti-seizure medications are the most commonly prescribed, and Shekhar says they have debilitating side effects. Also led by IU Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences Dr. Yvonne Lai, Anagin says its treatment takes aim at the source of the disease, rather than treating just the symptoms.   “Our treatment works on a very specific nerve cell mechanism that is critical for developing the whole disorder,” says Shekhar. “[Our drug] treats one of the fundamental mechanisms that causes the disease…and disrupts the mechanism within the cell that perpetuates the symptoms.”   In addition to the $25,000 cash prize, BioCrossroads will provide Anagin various business development support services; Anagin leaders say this builds critical momentum for attracting future funding, and ultimately, moving their drug to the marketplace.   “The most exciting part for me is finding a treatment for an illness I’ve struggled to treat for 30 years,” says Shekhar. “It’d be phenomenal if we could find something that really works for PTSD, but if our theory is correct, it might work for many other serious brain diseases. This could open up a whole new field of drugs for brain disorders.”   Capturing second place and the $15,000 prize at the competition, Bloomington-based Wellplay Health says its video game technology will help stroke and TBI patients with the challenging and arduous rehabilitation process. Compliance data shows only 31 percent of patients typically perform rehabilitation exercises as prescribed, says Wellplay...

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